As I’ve grown older, I’ve started to think that perhaps the villains had a point. Voldemort was scared of death. King Stephen got on the bad side of Maleficent by choosing sides in the fairy wars (fight me on this). Ursula just wanted payment for providing a service. Te Fiti/Te Kā wanted Maui to give her back her heart. For me, Captain Hook is a standout. My favorite versions of the character appear in the 1960 musical version starring Mary Martin and Cyril Ritchard (the most fabulous Hook to exist in my opinion) and the 1991 movie Hook starring Robin Williams and Dustin Hoffman. Because I think Captain Hook has invaluable lessons for people, let’s consider for a moment – Captain Hook, Architect.

INTRODUCING YOURSELF TO NEW CLIENTS

Everyone needs a Mr. Smee. I would like to go in to a meeting with a stellar introduction, even if it’s a bit snarky.

 

WHEN A CLIENT THROWS A CURVE BALL AND YOU NEED A NEW PLAN

This happens rather frequently and I should say that changes and curve balls are totally expected. I think all future brainstorming sessions should be via the Tarantella. While we don’t have the song and dance down quite yet, many of us in the office do crank up the music when devising schemes.

 

WHEN YOU CAN’T TELL HOW A CLIENT FEELS ABOUT A DESIGN

While presenting a new schematic design to a client, I try to read their body language and facial expressions. Many people can’t hide their feelings, but a special few can be incredibly difficult to read.

 

EVERYONE IS CALLING AND MAKING DEMANDS OF YOUR TIME

Everyone can relate to this in some way, shape, or form – Captain Hook just put it into words. It’s no different in the world of architecture.

 

WHEN YOU’VE SUCCEEDED

Hook! Hook! Hook! Who doesn’t want to have people cheering your name?

 

What life lessons have you learned from villains?